PRS Trip to Antarctica, Jan 2006 - Page 6 of 6

Visit to Patriot Hills, the South Pole and QUaD, and Patuxent Ranges.

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Members of the Scott Centenary reenactment in their period Harris tweeds and reindeer skin boots
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One of my fondest moment upon our return to Punta Arenas
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A last look at the IL-76 from the jet flying me back home
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Dr. Rick Fienberg - Editor-in-chief, Sky & Telescope magazine, Cambridge, MA
Harry Otten - Dutch meteorologist extraordinaire, Wageningen, Netherlands
Dr. Walter Sullivan - Plastic surgeon, photographer and cat lover, Las Vegas
Pierre Schwob - Entrepreneur, Palo Alto, CA
Peter Oberbeck - The he-man, retired engineer, in the bra, Kentucky
Chris Dixon - World-class bridge player and entrepreneur, Bath, UK

Our heartfelt thanks to the following organizations who made this possible:

TravelQuest International
Antarctic Logistics & Expeditions

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And, finally, here's Nana with my ice ax and her penguins, happy to have me back...
Nana happy to have me back

I was planning to join a dive to the bottom of the ocean at the exact geographical North Pole in August '07. Had never been done before!! (14,400 ft below the ice cap.) A Guiness Book thing, or a killer... Involving a nuclear ice breaker, a support ship and two deep- (I mean deep) -sea submersibles. Then we were told the Russians (who operate the ships and the MIRs) needed the room for their own folks, so we were bumped. Happily, as it turned out, since they used this opportunity to drop a titanium Russian flag down there thereby, many say, claiming the North Pole as their own. It would have been a bit dodgy being part of THAT expedition! I also wanted to follow that up with a quick hop to the edge of space in a Mig-25 (up to 80,000ft) where the sky gets black and the curvature of the Earth is clearly visible. Fun. Perhaps another time soon, all that.

The real North Pole dive
80,000 feet up in a Mig-25